NEW JERSEY REGISTER
VOLUME 33, NUMBER 11
MONDAY, JUNE 4, 2001
RULE PROPOSAL

LAW AND PUBLIC SAFETY
DIVISION OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS
NEW JERSEY STATE BOARD OF ARCHITECTS
DESIGN BUILD CONTRACTS

Additions are indicated by <<+ Text +>>; deletions by +<<- Text -+>>. Changes in tables are made but not highlighted.

Reproposed New Rules: N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A

Authorized By: New Jersey State Board of Architects, James Hsu, Executive Director.

Authority: N.J.S.A. 45:3-3.
Proposal Number: PRN 2001-188.

Submit written comments by July 4, 2001 to:

James Hsu, Executive Director
New Jersey State Board of Architects
PO Box 45001
Newark, New Jersey 07101

The agency proposal follows:

Summary

Proposed rules concerning design build contracts were originally published in the November 17, 1997 New Jersey Register at 29 N.J.R. 4736(a). Upon consideration of the comments received and Board review of the rules as proposed, the Board has decided to repropose these rules with changes from the original proposal. A summary of the comments received on the original proposal and the Board's responses follows.

The Board received comments from the following:

Paul L. Barlo, AIA

Richard F. Basta, AIA, EI Associates

Eastern Paralyzed Veterans Association

Harry A. DiFazio, AIA, NCARB

Harold Lichtman, AIA, President, American Institute of Architects New Jersey

Glenn W. Pellett, AIA, NCARB, President, Schemata Architectual Group, P.C.

Edward N. Rothe, Fellow, American Institute of Architects, President, Rothe Johnson Project Services Corp.

Michael G. Soriano, AIA, Legislative and Government Affairs Committee Chairperson, American Institute of Architects New Jersey

Alan M. Wallack, Esq., on behalf of American Institute of Architects New Jersey

COMMENT: Mr. Wallack, on behalf of AIA New Jersey, has requested a one month extension of time to submit written comments so that AIA can solicit and incorporate in its comments the views of numerous members throughout the State.

RESPONSE: In a notice published in the February 2, 1998 New Jersey Register at 30 N.J.R. 516(c), the Board extended the comment period on the proposal from December 17, 1997 to March 2, 1998.

COMMENT: Mr. DiFazio, Mr. Lichtman, and Mr. Soriano commented that N.J.A.C. 13:27-9.2(c), which prohibits the architect from functioning as the builder, will force the architect into a secondary role one step removed from the owner and contractually responsible primarily to the contractor. The commenters question what becomes of an architect who chooses to expand his service to the owner by assuming full control of the process with the full knowledge and consent of the owner. They point out that the same rules apply to disclosure and communication, and even more so in this case because the architect is now primarily responsible to the owner. They believe that the only difference is that the architect who takes on this responsibility will have set a higher standard for his service since there is no one with whom he can share the responsibility. The commenters urge the Board to eliminate the definition of "significant beneficial interest" and reword N.J.A.C. 13:27-9.2(c) as follows: "The compensation or financial interest of an architect for the performance of architectural services for a contractor in connection with a design build contract shall not be contingent upon, or conditioned on, the satisfaction of any term or condition of such design build contract, nor upon any circumstance or agreement which may interfere with the exercise of the architect's independent, professional judgment consistent with established standards of architectural practice, the rules of professional conduct set forth at N.J.A.C. 13:27-5, and such other statutory and regulatory requirements as may be applicable."

RESPONSE: The Board did not intend these rules to prohibit an architect from ever functioning as a builder, contractor, owner, or developer. However, the Board wants to clarify that a design build contract, as specifically defined in these reproposed new rules, refers to the situation where an architect subcontracts to perform architectural services for a contractor, who undertakes a project with an owner or developer that entails construction or building alterations and architectural services. While an architect can assume many roles, the rules are intended to be applied only to that very specific situation. Additionally, the Board agrees with the commenter that the rule as originally proposed was confusing and the Board has omitted that section from the rule in this reproposal. Instead, the Board proposes that there be written, informed consent between the architect and the owner or developer with regard to any significant beneficial interests and that the architect ensure that the contract between the contractor and the owner or developer also disclose any significant beneficial interests that exist between any parties in the design build contract.

COMMENT: Mr. Barlo comments that disallowing an architect ownership in a construction company is unnecessary and contrary to the design build concept. He states that the implication is that architects will be denied a substantial growth opportunity and have less control of the design build process. Moreover, the architect who has ownership and provides full disclosure to an owner will be striving to provide a higher standard of service because of a single source responsibility. Finally, Mr. Barlo states that AIA Document A-191 Design/Builder Agreement is an excellent tool for defining the rights and obligations of the parties, and he suggests that inclusion of the disclosure along with A-191 is sufficient regulation of the design build process.

RESPONSE: The Board would like to further clarify that the proposed new rules are intended to apply only to design build contracts as they are specifically defined in N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.1. Other possible scenarios that may develop in the design build process are not regulated by the proposed new rules.

COMMENT: Eastern Paralyzed Veterans Association (EPVA) comments that it is a private nonprofit organization serving the needs of veterans with spinal cord impairments and all people with disabilities. It points out that it has been at the forefront of the disability rights movement and was integral in passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. Moreover, in the past year, its Advocacy Program has been active in providing training on Federal and State barrier-free design requirements to architects affiliated with the AIA in New Jersey and New York.

EPVA recommends that the responsibilities of all parties for compliance with the ADA and all State and local accessibility requirements be clearly spelled out in the contract. The architect, contractor, and owner must comply with barrier-free design requirements. It states that the architect must take responsibility for accurately specifying and designing plans in conformance with all relevant Federal, State and local accessibility guidelines, and the contractor must be mindful of and take responsibility for implementation of all relevant accessibility requirements as specified by the architect. The contractor must also be sure to include any accessible design elements that the architect may have overlooked. Overall, the EPVA comments that the design build contract must reflect these obligations.

RESPONSE: N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.3, originally proposed as 13:27-9.2(b), specifies that the contract between the architect and the contractor requires that the architect comply with "other statutory and regulatory requirements as may be applicable." This provision would include ADA requirements. To specifically mention ADA compliance without mentioning compliance with other specific statutory or regulatory requirements may be interpreted as excluding requirements not specifically mentioned. The Board wishes to avoid such misinterpretation and believes that it is unnecessary to list all such requirements.

COMMENT: Mr. Basta strongly objects to N.J.A.C. 13:27-9.2(c) and states that it has the effect of making it illegal for an architect to act in the capacity of contractor on projects the architect designs, with the exception of rare cases. Mr. Basta objects to the rule because an architect is the one party in the construction industry who is most qualified and responsible to become a contractor, and the architect is qualified to provide construction services by virtue of both training and experience. Moreover, by virtue of licensing, the architect is the one professional in the building industry mandated to protect the public interest while contractors have no such mandate.

Mr. Basta states that the rule restrains an architect's capacity to do business in the State while providing no public benefit. He states that architects successfully provide design build services throughout the world, including the United States, with no harm to the public. New Jersey is not unique, and it cannot justify restricting this practice in the State. Mr. Basta also states that the rule places a hardship on New Jersey architects who wish to provide design build services in other states. He states that the restrictions may prohibit out of state firms from providing any design build services in the State without justification.

Mr. Basta states that New Jersey licensed architects will become isolated from the world community which will have a negative effect on society, and restricting design build in New Jersey will reduce open competition in the market place which may increase costs and result in less efficient business practices. Finally, he believes that the rule will cause a decline in commerce in New Jersey with a concurrent loss of jobs. Overall, Mr. Basta asks the Board to eliminate the restriction.

RESPONSE: As stated above, the rule does not prohibit an architect in a design build contract from acting in the capacity of a contractor, owner or developer, and the changes made to the rule in this reproposal has clarified the Board's intent.

COMMENT: Mr. Pellet objects to N.J.A.C. 13:27-9.2(c) because many architects, including his firm, have experienced erosion of their earning abilities due partially to the shrinking arena in which they are permitted to provide services. Moreover, he states that other entities can provide those services in the same arena, and this aspect of the proposed new rules shrinks the arena in which architects are permitted to play. Mr. Pellet also objects to the Board's assumption that the architect should take a secondary position in a design build contract pursuant to N.J.A.C. 13:27-9.2(a). He believes that architects are capable of serving as the prime contractor in this instance and engaging a builder. He also believes that there are several architect builders in the State that perform design and build services.

RESPONSE: As stated above, the rules in this reproposal do not prohibit an architect having a substantial beneficial interest in a contractor from entering into design build contracts as defined in N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.1. However, the Board does intend that the owner or developer be fully aware of the significant beneficial interest and be assured that regardless of the interest, the architect will nonetheless exercise independent professional judgment in the rendering of architectural service for that owner or developer. Therefore, the reproposal includes a proposed new section requiring that there be disclosure of the relationship followed by informed, written consent between the architect and the owner or developer. Moreover, the Board, in this reproposal is also requiring that all parties recognize the architect nonetheless has the duty to exercise independent, professional judgment in the rendering of architectural services and that the architect ensure that the contract between the contractor and owner or developer also discloses the significant beneficial interest.

COMMENT: Mr. Rothe comments that, although the proposal intends to maintain an open line of communication between the architect and owner, it also seeks to limit and prohibit the architect from providing the services for which he or she is qualified. He states that requiring an architect to be contractually responsible to the contractor (builder) while professionally responsible to the owner is unrealistic and impractical. Mr. Rothe also states that his corporation has been a certified design/builder since 1989, and it has provided sole source design/build services for its clients in full compliance with the Building Design Services Act. The firm has always put design value first, and by having the contractual responsibility directly with its clients, it is in a better position to serve them and the profession. He states that this is something which it is not in a position to do when it is hired by a contractor. Overall, he states that the proposal would prohibit his firm and its employees from conducting their business and have the public perceive that architects are incapable of leading the design/build process or are unqualified to be responsible for building construction. Mr. Rothe urges the Board to eliminate N.J.A.C. 13:27-9.2(c).

RESPONSE: The rules do not attempt to prohibit an architect from providing services. As stated above, the proposed new rules are applicable only to the situation specifically defined at N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.1 as a design build contract.

In the reproposal, the Board proposes a new subchapter at N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A which governs design build contracts. In the original proposal, the Board codified the subchapter as N.J.A.C. 13:27-9; however, in this reproposal, the rules have been codified to subchapter 7A. This is because subchapter 8 involves the regulation of landscape architects and the Board has decided that the design build rules which regulate architects should be codified with the other architect rules.

Proposed N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.1, which was originally proposed as N.J.A.C. 13:27-9.1, is a definitional section which identifies the terms "architect," "contractor," "design build contract," "fundamental change," "immediate family," "owner or developer" and "significant beneficial interest." For purposes of this subchapter, a design build contract is a written contract between a contractor and an owner or developer which governs the construction or alteration of a building, group of buildings, structure, or group of structures within the State and entails the contractor entering into a separate contract with an architect for the rendering of architectural services on that project. The architect in this situation is not an employee of the contractor but rather is engaged by the contractor as an independent professional pursuant to a separate written contract. This limited scenario is the only situation to which the proposed new rules are applicable. As indicated by the comments discussed above, this concept was a source of great confusion, so the Board wants to make clear that these rules apply only to the particular situation delineated above.

Proposed N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.2, originally proposed as N.J.A.C. 13:27-9.2, sets forth the notice provisions governing design build contracts. Proposed N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.2(a) provides that an architect may perform architectural services for a contractor only if the contract between the contractor and the owner or developer contains a notice which identifies the architect or architectural firm and sets forth the architect's or architectural firm's address and telephone number. The notice must specifically state that, although the architect is contractually obligated to provide services to the contractor, the owner or developer and the architect may communicate at any time to discuss ancillary issues relating to the design of the building. The Board has made slight changes to this section in the reproposal in order to clarify that the contract referred to in this subsection is that between the contractor and the owner or developer. The Board acknowledges that its licensees do not draft this notice but it is making them responsible for reading the contract between the contractor and the owner or developer and ensuring that before entering into design build contracts as regulated by this subchapter, this notice is included.

Proposed N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.3, originally proposed as N.J.A.C. 13:27- 9.2(b), governs the separate written contract between the contractor and the architect. In particular, that agreement must state that the architect is an independent contractor and not an employee of the contractor, the architect must exercise independent professional judgment consistent with accepted standards, the architect may at any time discuss with the owner or developer issues pertinent to the design of the building which is the subject of the contract, and the contractor and the architect must give the owner or developer at least 30 days' written notice before the contract between the architect and contractor is terminated, or before the architect in any way suspends or discontinues services.

Proposed N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.4, originally proposed as N.J.A.C. 13:27- 9.2(c), sets forth requirements that must be fulfilled when a significant beneficial interest exists between the architect and the contractor. As originally proposed, this section prohibited an architect from possessing an ownership or other legal or financial interest in a contractor for whom the architect performs architectural services in connection with the contract unless the architect possesses a significant beneficial interest in the owner or developer, or in both the contractor and the owner or developer. In this reproposal, the Board has removed this prohibition and in its stead is proposing N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.4(a)1, which requires that there be informed, written consent between the architect and owner or developer. Additionally, at N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.4(a)2, the architect must make sure that the contract between the contractor and the owner or developer also includes disclosure of the significant beneficial interest and states that the architect must still exercise independent professional judgment as set out at N.J.A.C. 13:27- 7A.3(a)2. As with the notice pursuant to N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.2(a), it is recognized that the architect will not draft these clauses but an obligation is placed upon the architect to make sure that the contract between the contractor and owner or developer includes them. If the provisions are not included, the architect may not render the architectural services.

Proposed N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.5, originally proposed as N.J.A.C. 13:27- 9.2(d), addresses when the architect is requested or directed to make fundamental changes. Specifically, when an architect is aware that an owner has accepted and relies upon any design or construction documents which the architect has prepared, and where the architect is requested to make any fundamental changes, the architect must notify the owner and the contractor of the potential change(s) in writing and receive written consent from both parties to proceed with the change(s). The main difference between this section in the reproposal and that originally proposed is that in this reproposal the architect must obtain permission to make the change. In the prior version, the architect could make the change and then notify that the change was made. The Board believes it is more logical and ethical to require permission before making the change because this will save architects from making changes and then having to undo them. Furthermore, the Board believes that given the definition of fundamental change, it is appropriate that there be notification and permission before making the change(s) because they are of a magnitude that can have substantial financial ramifications.

Proposed N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.6, originally proposed as N.J.A.C. 13:27- 9.2(e), requires an architect to retain a copy of any contract entered into with a contractor in connection with a design build project for 10 years from the date of the contract.

Social Impact

The proposed new rules will have a positive impact by maintaining and facilitating an open line of communication among the architect, contractor, and owner or developer who participate in a design build contract, and by requiring the architect involved in the contract to adhere to applicable legal standards.

The proposed new rules also help to ensure that the architect involved in a design build contract functions as an independent professional, and at all times keeps the respective parties informed of any fundamental change(s) that have been ordered or requested and receives appropriate permission to proceed with those changes.

Economic Impact

The proposed new rules will have a positive economic impact on the owner or the builder involved in the design build contract by requiring an architect to advise the owner and the contractor in writing of any fundamental change, as specifically defined in the subchapter, which the architect intends to make. This proposed requirement encourages an open line of communication and protects the financial interests of the owner or developer by making sure the owner or developer actually agrees to the change being made; moreover, if the change(s) are directed by the owner or developer, the contractor needs to know because this can impact on the timing and costs of the project, making it differ from those in the contract between the contractor and the owner or developer.

The proposed new rules will have a positive impact upon all parties to a design build contract by facilitating open communication and helping to minimize loss or waste.

Federal Standards Statement

A Federal standards analysis is not required for the proposed new rules because the subject matter is not subject to Federal standards.

Jobs Impact

The Board believes that the proposed new rules will not cause an increase or decrease of jobs in the State. The proposed new rules may, however, have a negative impact on work that may be performed by architects to the extent that they will have to make sure that certain provisions are included in contracts between other parties. The Board proposes these rules to delineate the parameters of the design build contract, and to set forth the rights and obligations of the parties. If the required provisions are not included in the contracts and the other parties do not ultimately include them, the architect is not permitted to provide services for that contract. However, the Board believes that any negative impact on the amount of design build work that may be performed by architects is outweighed by the importance of the public policy of ensuring that these projects are carried out in an ethical manner.

Agriculture Industry Impact

The proposed new rules will have no impact on the agriculture industry in the State.

Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

The Regulatory Flexibility Act (the Act), N.J.S.A. 52:14B-16 et seq. requires the Board to give a description of the types and an estimate of the number of small businesses to which the proposed rules will apply. If, for the purposes of the Act, the 7,193 architects licensed in the State of New Jersey are considered small businesses, then the following analysis applies:

The proposed new rules impose reporting, recordkeeping, and other compliance requirements. Proposed N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.2 imposes compliance and reporting requirements to the extent that the architect or architectural firm providing architectural services to a contractor in connection with the design build contract be identified in a written notice and to ascertain that the notice actually is included in the contract between the contractor and the owner or developer. Proposed N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.3 imposes compliance and reporting requirements to the extent that the written contract between the contractor and the architect must set forth the specific information contained in the rule. Proposed new rule N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.4 imposes reporting requirements to the extent that an architect must notify the contractor and the owner or developer of any fundamental design or construction changes that are ordered and obtain written permission to make those changes. Moreover, proposed N.J.A.C. 13:27- 7A.3(a)4 imposes reporting requirements to the extent that the contractor and the architect must give the owner or developer 30 days' written notice prior to termination or suspension of the contract between the architect and the contractor.

Proposed new rule N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.6 imposes recordkeeping requirements to the extent that an architect must retain a copy of any contract between the architect and the contractor in connection with the design build contract for at least 10 years from the contract date.

The proposed new rules impose other compliance requirements. Each architect involved in a design build contract must provide architectural services as an independent contractor, and not as an employee of the contractor. Proposed new rule N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.4 requires written disclosure to the owner or developer when an architect has a significant beneficial interest in a contractor for whom the architect performs architectural services in connection with a design build contract. The rule also requires that the architect obtain written consent from the owner or developer indicating that the owner or developer is aware of the significant beneficial interest and understands that the architect is bound to a standard of independent professional judgment.

Proposed new rule N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.2 may require the additional services of attorneys to assist in the drafting or review of the contract and to facilitate negotiations. Parties may incur the costs to retain these professionals to perform the services.

The proposed new rules minimize adverse economic consequences upon small businesses by allowing an architect to provide architectural services to a contractor in connection with a design build contract if the architect possesses a significant beneficial interest in the owner or developer or in both the contractor and the owner or developer. Because the Board has designed the new rules to further the welfare of the parties to a design build contract, the new rules will apply uniformly to all architects who engage in such contracts.

Full text of the proposed new rules follows:

<<+SUBCHAPTER 7A. DESIGN BUILD CONTRACTS+>>

<< NJ ADC 13:27-7A.1 >>

<<+13:27-7A.1 Definitions+>>

<<+The following words and terms, when used in this subchapter, shall have the following meanings unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:+>>

<<+"Architect" means an individual defined by N.J.A.C. 13:27-3.1 or business entity licensed or otherwise duly authorized by law to render architectural services within the State of New Jersey.+>>

<<+"Contractor" means any natural person or legal entity that enters into a design build contract with an owner or developer. The term "contractor" as defined herein is specifically distinguished from the term independent contractor as used to define the professional relationship between an architect and a contractor pursuant to N.J.S.A. 45:3-17 and 45:3-18.+>>

<<+"Design build contract" means a written contract, entered into between a contractor and an owner or developer, which provides both for the construction or alteration of a building, group of buildings, structure, or group of structures within the State of New Jersey and for the performance of architectural services by an architect retained by the contractor pursuant to a separate written contract.+>>

<<+"Fundamental change" means a modification which substantially and materially alters a basic design or creates a substitution which will result in substantial financial damage if not disclosed to the owner.+>>

<<+"Immediate family" means a person's spouse and children, the person's siblings and parents, the person's spouse's siblings and parents, and the spouses of the person's children.+>>

<<+"Owner or developer" means any natural person or legal entity, including a private business corporation or a public body, such as the State, State agencies, authorities, and other governmental subdivisions which hold title or other legal interest in real property or the buildings located or to be located thereon and which enter into design build contracts for the construction or alteration of such buildings.+>>

<<+"Significant beneficial interest" means an ownership or other legal or financial interest in a contractor held by an architect or any member, associate, shareholder, officer, or employee of an architect's firm or the immediate family of any such party.+>>

<< NJ ADC 13:27-7A.2 >>

<<+13:27-7A.2 Design build contract; notice+>>

<<+(a) Before an architect may perform architectural services for a contractor in connection with a design build contract, the architect shall ascertain that the contract between the contractor and the owner or developer contains the following notice:+>>

<<+NOTICE+>>

<<+This is a design build contract. Pursuant to N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.1, a design build contract is a written contract entered into between a contractor and an owner or developer which provides both for the construction or alteration of a building and for the performance of architectural services by an architect engaged by the contractor pursuant to a separate written contract. The architect or architectural firm that will be providing architectural services to the contractor in connection with this design build contract will be: _______.+>>

<<+The architect's address and telephone number are: _______.+>>

<<+The architect is contractually obligated to provide services to the contractor. The owner or developer and the architect may, at any time, discuss issues pertinent to the design of the building which is the subject of the design build contract.+>>

<< NJ ADC 13:27-7A.3 >>

<<+13:27-7A.3 Contractual provisions between architect and contractor+>>

<<+(a) In addition to any other contractual terms and conditions agreed to by the parties, the separate written contract between the architect and the contractor shall expressly provide that:+>>

<<+1. The architect shall, at all times, provide architectural services as an independent contractor pursuant to N.J.S.A. 45:3-17 and 45:3-18 and not as an employee of the contractor;+>>

<<+2. In providing architectural services, the architect shall, at all times, exercise independent, professional judgment consistent with established standards of architectural practice, the rules of professional conduct set forth at N.J.A.C. 13:27-5, and such other statutory and regulatory requirements as may be applicable;+>>

<<+3. The architect may, at any time, discuss with the owner or developer issues pertinent to the design of the building which is the subject of the design build contract; and+>>

<<+4. The contractor and the architect shall provide written notice to the owner or developer at least 30 days before the contract between the architect and the contractor is terminated, or before the performance of services by the architect is in any other way suspended or discontinued.+>>

<< NJ ADC 13:27-7A.4 >>

<<+13:27-7A.4 Disclosure of significant beneficial interest+>>

<<+(a) When an architect has a significant beneficial interest in a contractor for whom the architect performs architectural services in connection with a design build contract, prior to the parties entering into the contract, the architect shall:+>>

<<+1. Disclose the significant beneficial interest to the owner or developer in writing and obtain the owner or developer's written consent indicating that the owner or developer is aware of the significant beneficial interest, understands that the architect is bound to a standard of independent professional judgment consistent with N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.3(a)2, and that the owner or developer consents to the architect's participation in the project; and+>>

<<+2. Ascertain that the contract between the contractor and the owner or developer discloses the significant beneficial interest and states that regardless of the significant beneficial interest, the architect shall comply with a standard of independent professional judgment consistent with N.J.A.C. 13:27-7A.3(a)2.+>>

<< NJ ADC 13:27-7A.5 >>

<<+13:27-7A.5 Design or construction documents; notice of changes+>>

<<+Where an architect has knowledge that an owner has accepted and is relying upon any design or construction documents prepared by the architect, and where the architect is requested or directed by any party to make fundamental changes in those design or construction documents, the architect shall give immediate written notice of the proposed change(s) to the owner and to the contractor. The architect shall not proceed with the changes unless the owner or developer and the contractor agree to the changes in the signed writings.+>>

<< NJ ADC 13:27-7A.6 >>

<<+13:27-7A.6 Contract retention+>>

<<+An architect shall retain a copy of any contract entered into with a contractor in connection with a design build project for 10 years from the date of the contract.+>>


Consumer Affairs Home Page

Rule Proposals

| New Jersey State Board of Architects

Other Professional and Occupational Licensing Boards

Department of Law and Public Safety's Home Page | State of New Jersey's Home Page

Feedback

___________________________________________

Posted June 2001